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This shows all forum posts by the user Rating Orb E β DeNovo:

DeNovo`s Avatar
24yr
United States
MelancholicSanguine
201F
61 / 4
Rating Orb E β DeNovo, Lawful Neutral Programmer – joined 9 years ago How do you judge people?..XXX.XXX5 years ago
Tripledot,

Make no mistake, we are aware of your presence on the archive site, and my best advice to you is that you should seek professional help. Your expectations of others as you describe it are unforgiving, unrealistic, and have demonstrably fueled extremely hurtful behavior. I'm not sure what you were hoping to get out of another person by acting the way you have, refusing to accept them and perpetually berating them for failing to share your values or do as you ask. I don't know pretend to know what you're thinking, but I can tell you without any hesitation that your behavior will deprive you of any sort of company, especially of anyone whose company you might actually desire.

As of now, we are not banning you, but that is still up to Pseudo, really. I just hope you become someone who can meet and maintain the sort of relationships you seem to want so badly to have.

DeNovo

And no, I am not speaking on behalf of anyone.
Ephemeral dreams and perpetual ire; melodious lies from Eternity
  (1)

DeNovo`s Avatar
24yr
United States
MelancholicSanguine
201F
61 / 4
Rating Orb E β DeNovo, Lawful Neutral Programmer – joined 9 years ago Those Left Behind..XXX.XXX6 years ago
We're not all gone! D:

Ironically enough, the forums weren't very active before the new site opened when I would check it. I rarely had something I wanted to say in any given ongoing thread, so I didn't.

It's definitely true that people are a lot more interested in the new site than the old one, but some of us come back and check to see if anything interesting is happening around here as well. :D The new site is flourishing with, uh... repeats of old threads that got locked a long time ago on this site, like the chicken or egg problem and other issues! And lurking in chat is still lurking in chat, which is just as exciting as it sounds.

Don't be sad! This is your opportunity to mingle with people who aren't all rather exclusive old-timers!
Ephemeral dreams and perpetual ire; melodious lies from Eternity
  (2)

DeNovo`s Avatar
24yr
United States
MelancholicSanguine
201F
61 / 4
Rating Orb E β DeNovo, Lawful Neutral Programmer – joined 9 years ago On Paying for Flash Games..XXX.XXX7 years ago
You paint an incredibly dire picture of the future, kellus. Let me go and find a list of profitable, existing flash-based games.

1. Farmville
2. Neopets
3. Adventure Quest, one of the earliest ones I came across.

I agree that the market for console-like games sold through the Flash platform is different. But I'm going to disagree on the following points:

1. Pseudo's current fans are the *likeliest* group to pay for his games.
This depends on the games Pseudo makes from now on. As you'll notice Pseudo actually makes games which attempt to appeal to a different audience than than social gaming audience, such as those that Farmville attract. If Pseudo can market his games enough, and draw the attention of the 18-35 demographic (who buy things on steam already, and so forth), software licensing for episodic content is a very viable format. I imagine people would willingly shell out the $4.99 or whatever it costs if that meant that they could play Mardek 4 past, say the prologue or something.

2. People who dislike the idea of paying for games won't pay for them.
Honestly, for all the people who say they can't, won't, or don't want to pay for the game, I understand why they feel the way they do. And Pseudo shouldn't alienate them, certainly not. But it turns out there are lots of other options for them to be able to play. I'm almost certain that the world of in-game commercials will make their way to flash, and players could play for free, if they were willing to watch an ad every 15 minutes or so. This pays Pseudo, and the people who can't pay for the game get to play the game anyway. What's more, we don't have any data but I'm still convinced that if Pseudo gave early access to his games for money, he would make actual money. There are 1000 currently active members on the site, and I'm willing to bet that 10% of those people would be willing to pay money to get beta access to a game that's 3 months from release. What Pseudo charges for this access is up to him, and I'd actually advise a "pay what you wish" model instead of an asking price. Long story short, though, kids aren't allowed to spend money, or have credit cards, but kids have money, and these kids are capable of speaking with their parents, who have credit cards. It's honestly no different from going up to your father and asking him if you can buy that new action figure.

3. The paying user base is doomed to shrink over time.
This is a statement that implies a great deal about Pseudo's games; for whatever reason, Pseudo is doomed to never attract a larger audience. I don't believe this to be true. I expect Pseudo's games to improve and mature in terms of art, writing, and development costs as he refines his craft, allowing him to make better games faster, and draw new audiences. I'm not entirely certain that everyone who would want to play Mardek 3 knows it exists yet. I'm almost entirely certain that there are people who would pay for Mardek 3 who have not been given that opportunity. I don't know what you reasons are for thinking Pseudo will spend years making RPGs that fewer and fewer people are willing to pay for, but I do know that this is not the future I see.


I'm not sure the flash gamer market is ready for the license key based model yet, but I do know that the market exists, and that there will be other ways to compensate Pseudo for what he does.
Ephemeral dreams and perpetual ire; melodious lies from Eternity
  (2)

DeNovo`s Avatar
24yr
United States
MelancholicSanguine
201F
61 / 4
Rating Orb E β DeNovo, Lawful Neutral Programmer – joined 9 years ago A technical question about flash games:..XXX.XXX7 years ago
Well, I was hoping this would be answered by someone else, but I guess I should post the link to the wikipedia object here and clear this up once and for all.

[LINK]

In particular, for Windows XP:

The default storage location for LSO files is operating system-dependent. LSO files are typically stored with a ".SOL" extension, within each User's directory. Note that for self-executing flash applications run on the local machine will show up as being run on a website, in the folder localhost.
Windows XP:
%APPDATA%MacromediaFlash Player#SharedObjects<random code><domain><path - maybe┬░><object name>.sol
%APPDATA%MacromediaFlash Playermacromedia.comsupportflashplayersys
C:WINDOWSsystem32Macromed[subdirectories]filename.sol
For AIR Applications: %APPDATA%<AIR Application Reverse Domain Name>Local Store#SharedObjects<flash filename>.swf<object name>.sol

Save data is generally transferable between computers and/or websites, simply by copying the contained data from one folder to another. I hope this helps! :D
Ephemeral dreams and perpetual ire; melodious lies from Eternity
  (2)

DeNovo`s Avatar
24yr
United States
MelancholicSanguine
201F
61 / 4
Rating Orb E β DeNovo, Lawful Neutral Programmer – joined 9 years ago New Ideas..XXX.XXX7 years ago
Reinventing the wheel is a an common occurrence, all around the world, all the time. Really, the fact that you think about things this way is far more important and valuable than what you've thought of, much like Aiur suggests. The most masterful innovators in any field tend not to be the people who produce new ideas from scratch, but the ones with backlogs of ideas bouncing around in their heads, colliding and producing interesting combinations. Creativity is just as much about producing new ideas is it about recombining old ones. So if you're thinking of things that have already been invented, you're on the right track. All you need to do is find an area which no one has solved yet, and then start throwing ideas against it until you're the guy who everyone else is blaming for taking their ideas before you even thought of it. Or, better yet, figure out how your ideas on an existing solution could further improve that solution. Really, being alive in this day and age means that you have an incredible wealth of ideas to draw from, which makes your job less about being the first guy to it and all about being the guy who makes it all the way there.

Also, would you really rather you lived in an era without refrigeration, just so you could be the one who invented things? I take modern ingenuity as the blessing it is, and view the accomplishments of the bright people in this world as a stepping stones to even greater things, instead of another dead-end down which nothing remains.
Ephemeral dreams and perpetual ire; melodious lies from Eternity
  (3)

DeNovo`s Avatar
24yr
United States
MelancholicSanguine
201F
61 / 4
Rating Orb E β DeNovo, Lawful Neutral Programmer – joined 9 years ago Experiential And Emperical Knowledge: Why Science And Religion Can Coexist..XXX.XXX7 years ago
Hmm... this sounds a lot like a very specific religion: [LINK]

You bring up a commonly misunderstood perspective on the nature of science and theology, and make good on the fact that the two are, indeed, not necessarily in direct opposition. Sadly enough, there is much to say about the reality of things in comparison to the theoretical existences of both. Let's start with history.

Historically, religion has heavily and liberally stomped on the followers of science; those in power too often rush to silence anything which threatens their hold. In the case of religion, this has the unfortunate bonus of being a belief. Companies attempt to squash competitors, and as such, religions need to fend off alternative theories in order to maintain their hold over the people. The problem is that for something that rules by virtue of people believing it, shaking any part of the people's belief immediately and irrevocably weakens its power. When Galileo Galilei was persecuted for saying that the Earth went around the Sun, and not vice versa, religion was attempting to silence science. When John Scopes was tried for teaching children that life may not have been the way it is now, religious government was overstepping the bounds of science. People in power feel threatened by dissenting opinion, and act accordingly; this is human nature.

Theoretically, science is nothing more than the scientific method, and the results obtained by applying this method. Everything we consider science is in some phase of the scientific method, and will probably continue to cycle through hypothesis, experiment, conclusion well after it's been accepted by the vast majority. There is nothing about science which specifically rules out *any* possibility--there is only proof for, against, and the application of logic. It is scientifically foolish to deny the existence of gravity, but not to question the cause. It is scientifically impossible to prove that life originated from a single organism, but not to support the theory with archeological findings and real-world phenomena. Science, as far as I know it, says nothing about religion. A scientist can just as easily argue that two things fall at the same speed regardless of weight as he or she can attempt to demonstrate evidence of supernatural entities. People who want to prove the existence of dragons, extraterrestrial life, and magic appeal to the same methods which scientists apply.

However, science is inconclusive where religion is absolute.

In religion, the Bible is not "wrong," only misinterpreted. In science, a theory is never "true," only widely accepted. The two are polar opposites in how they are practiced. Science easily and undeniably encompasses religious beliefs, while religions explicitly and unabashedly disputes scientific theories. I would say that a scientist can believe in God, but a religious fanatic will never be open to scientific methodology. Their coexistence has little to do with what you believe, and everything to do with *how* you believe. So it's possible, absolutely. But if you're trying to think about them as nations at war, you're looking at what people do because of their beliefs, and not the compatibility of the beliefs themselves. Being narrow-minded has nothing to do with being religious, and being judgmental of others can happen regardless of what or why you believe.

In theory, religions are just a set of theories that are still unverifiable through science. In practice, religions are rationalizations of human behavior, too often threatened by true rational thought. The open mind is a dangerous thing, because open minds question authority. So no, among the truly devout (and in this case atheism counts just as much as Catholicism as a source of devotion), there is no reconciling these two entities. But for everyone else, it's only sensible to live with a bit of both.

Good topic, by the way. :D

Ephemeral dreams and perpetual ire; melodious lies from Eternity
  (5)

DeNovo`s Avatar
24yr
United States
MelancholicSanguine
201F
61 / 4
Rating Orb E β DeNovo, Lawful Neutral Programmer – joined 9 years ago Tips on my code Actionscript 3..XXX.XXX7 years ago
Meet your new best friend! [LINK]

These are the Adobe LiveDocs, which want very badly to look and feel like JavaDocs. And they come pretty close to it, too! Anyway, with regards to splice(), it turns out splice is used in the following fashion:

Code:
var example:Array = new Array(1,2,3,4,5,6);
trace(example); // prints out \"1,2,3,4,5,6
example.splice(2, 2, \"three\", \"four\");
trace(example); // prints out \"1,2,three,four,5,6\"


As you can tell, for some unexplained reason Adobe made slice() and splice() behave very differently. Splice() actually takes the second argument to be how many items you want to pull out of the array, instead of the end index, so you were actually pulling out 2 items every time you called that. As a general tip, I learned the most about programming in AS3 from the livedocs linked above, and simple trial and error. You can print all the contents of an array just by passing it in as an argument, and by playing around with the parameters passed you'd see very quickly what was going on.

By the way, I'm happy to help you further, but I'm not sure this warrants a forum thread at this point. If anyone else wants to help they can introduce themselves here but otherwise we may as well do this via the very well-done PM system available on fighunter.com. :)
Ephemeral dreams and perpetual ire; melodious lies from Eternity
  (0)

DeNovo`s Avatar
24yr
United States
MelancholicSanguine
201F
61 / 4
Rating Orb E β DeNovo, Lawful Neutral Programmer – joined 9 years ago Tips on my code Actionscript 3..XXX.XXX7 years ago
Happy to help. You''ll notice a lot of the text has been modified after you posted it--" & g t ;" (without spaces) is the html encoding for ">", "& l t ;" for "<", and so on. Similarly, I think Pseudo's code switches out brackets for "<" and ">" when you post here, so I actually WAS using "[]".
The answers to your questions are a matter of syntactic sugar provided by most languages these days:

Code:
i=i+1; // increases i by 1
i+=1; // increases i by 1
i++; // increases i by 1


These three are equivalent. You can use the +=, *=, -=, /=, and so forth wherever you mean x = x (operator) y, in which case you simply type x (operator)=y. For instance, x = x * y is the same as x *= y.

Code:
var i = 0;
trace( i &lt; 0); // prints false
trace( i &lt; 0 || i == 0 ); // prints true, because the \"||\" operator is an OR, making this ( ( i &lt; 0 ) OR ( i == 0 ) )
trace( i&lt;= 0); //prints true, because i&lt;=0 means ( i&lt;0 ||  i==0 )
trace( i &gt;= 0); //prints true, because i&gt;=0
trace( i==0); //prints true, because i == 0 means i equals 0
trace( i != 0 ) //prints false, because i == 0


You can use this in if statements, without comparing them:
Code:
var i = 1;
if( i &gt; 0 ) trace(\" i is a positive number.\");


These all make the act of programming less tedious! I would suggest adding comments to your code as you go, because writing out what you're doing definitely helps you think about what you're doing, and makes coming back to it easier! :D
Ephemeral dreams and perpetual ire; melodious lies from Eternity
  (0)

DeNovo`s Avatar
24yr
United States
MelancholicSanguine
201F
61 / 4
Rating Orb E β DeNovo, Lawful Neutral Programmer – joined 9 years ago Tips on my code Actionscript 3..XXX.XXX7 years ago
Hey!

This looks like you wrote the game of FallDown, just by looking at the code. Fun times. :D I remember playing this game back during math class in high school on my graphing calculator. Anyway, you wanted coding style comments, and to start that off I should say, this is pretty good! I'm going to suggest a few things you might want to do to make the code more readable to other people, though. Starting with commenting!

1. Adding a comment is as easy as putting "//" in front of a line, or "/*" and then closing with "*/" (called a multiline comment). What this would allow you to do is to explain why the circle moves -radius/2 upwards if it's intersecting with a rectangle, while rectangles uniformly move -5. This is probably a bug that will manifest itself by a smaller ball falling through your level, and a bigger ball "bouncing" off of the platform. Comments are especially useful when you're doing something that isn't obvious, so this is always a good idea!

2. You might want to try to account for logical organization--the best way to do this is to break things into functions whenever possible, like the checks for player input versus the checks for intersection. I like to break things into logical blocks, separated by a space and/or a comment, so that my eyes can find them a lot more easily. When each section of code does only one sort of activity, it's easier to keep track of them and not miss changes you need to make.

3. I would actually give my variables longer names, in addition to explaining their purpose in comments. "left" and "right," for instance, might be called "leftKeyDown" or "moveLeft" and so on. I'd also try to name my functions by what they do, which means a name like "FirstCircle" might make more sense as "StartGame" since you do have a "GameOver" function. I notice that you call the method gameover and the onscreen image GameOver, which makes me think maybe you should rename one of the two. I'm leaning towards renaming both, to be honest, and calling GameOver GameOverImage or GameOverScreen, while renaming the function to "EndGame" to go well with the "StartGame" I suggested earlier. Self-commenting code via good names is always a great thing!

After making the bug fixes and some of the stylistic changes, this is what it looks like now:

Code:
//radius of the ball
var radius:int = 10;
//y velocity of the ball
var y_move:int = 10;
//Speed at which rectangles move
var upwardSpeed = 5;
var MAX_COUNT = 20;
//counts down between rectangle addition
var counter:int = -1;
//booleans indicating if the ball should move left or right
var moveLeft:Boolean = false;
var moveRight:Boolean = false;
var circle:MovieClip = new MovieClip();
var rectList:Array = new Array();
var hit:Boolean = false;


//Start the game
function StartGame ():void {
	GameOverScreen.visible=false
	circle.graphics.beginFill(0xFF0000,1);
	circle.graphics.drawCircle(0, 0, radius);
	circle.x = radius;
	circle.y = radius;
	circle.graphics.endFill();
	addChild(circle);
	addEventListener(Event.ENTER_FRAME, step);
	stage.addEventListener(KeyboardEvent.KEY_DOWN, KeyDown);
	stage.addEventListener(KeyboardEvent.KEY_UP, KeyUp);
}

//display GameOver screen, and prevent player movement
function EndGame():void {
	removeEventListener(Event.ENTER_FRAME, step)
	stage.removeEventListener(KeyboardEvent.KEY_DOWN, KeyDown)
	stage.removeEventListener(KeyboardEvent.KEY_UP, KeyUp)
	GameOverScreen.visible = true;
}

//run on every frame to update ball, rectangles etc
function step(event:Event):void {
	if (counter &lt; 1) {
		addRectangle();
		counter = MAX_COUNT;
	}
	counter--;
	handleRectangles();
	handleBall();

}

//update the ball
function handleBall()
{
	if (moveLeft == true) {
		circle.x-=10;
	}
	else if (moveRight == true) {
		circle.x+=10;
	}
	if (circle.x &gt; (300-radius * 2)) {
		circle.x = 300-radius * 2;
	}
	else if (circle.x &lt; 0) {
		circle.x = 0;
	}
	if (circle.y &gt;= stage.height-radius* 2)
	{
		circle.y = stage.height-radius* 2;
	}
	if( circle.y &lt; radius) {
		EndGame();
	}
	
}

//update the rectangles, and check for intersections
function handleRectangles()
{
	hit = false;
	var toRemove = new Array();
	for(var r in rectList) {
		rectList[r].y -= upwardSpeed;
		if (circle.hitTestObject(rectList[r]) && circle.y + y_move &gt;= rectList[r].y) {
			circle.y = rectList[r].y-radius;
			hit = true;
		}
		if (rectList[r].y &lt; 0) {
			toRemove.push(rectList[r]);
		}
	}
	if(!hit)
	{
		circle.y+=y_move;
	}

	for( var i in toRemove)
	{
		removeChild(toRemove<i>);
		rectList.shift();
	}
}

//Key listening event handlers
function KeyDown(k_event:KeyboardEvent):void {
	if (k_event.keyCode == 37) {
		moveLeft = true;
	}
	else if (k_event.keyCode == 39) {
		moveRight = true;
	}
}
function KeyUp(k_event:KeyboardEvent):void {
	if (k_event.keyCode == 37) {
		moveLeft = false;
	}
	if (k_event.keyCode == 39) {
		moveRight = false;
	}
}

//Draw a rectangle and add it to the screen.
function addRectangle():void {
	var rectangle1:MovieClip = new MovieClip();
	var rectangle2:MovieClip = new MovieClip();
	var hole:int = 300 * Math.random();
	rectangle1.graphics.beginFill(0x000000, 1);
	rectangle1.graphics.drawRect(0, 0,  hole-radius*2, 10)
	rectangle1.graphics.endFill();
	rectangle1.x = 300-hole+radius*2;
	rectangle1.y = stage.height-10;
	rectangle2.graphics.beginFill(0x000000, 1);
	rectangle2.graphics.drawRect(0, 0,  300-hole-radius*2, 10)
	rectangle2.y = stage.height-10;
	rectangle2.graphics.endFill();
	rectList.push(rectangle1);
	addChild(rectangle1);
	rectList.push(rectangle2);
	addChild(rectangle2);
}

StartGame();



I hope that helps! Let me know if you have questions about the differences.

Ephemeral dreams and perpetual ire; melodious lies from Eternity
  (4)

DeNovo`s Avatar
24yr
United States
MelancholicSanguine
201F
61 / 4
Rating Orb E β DeNovo, Lawful Neutral Programmer – joined 9 years ago Which Flash Version should I get?..XXX.XXX7 years ago
Wow, you saved up at least $700 to get official copies of Adobe Flash? That's something not even Pseudo has done. I think it's possible for you to design games without using the Adobe Flash IDE, but that's the only one you'll need to make games the way Pseudo does. I would suggest trying out something like FlashDevelop [LINK] first before putting in the money, as it's quite possible that it will suit your needs. Working with bitmap art (not vector graphics, which you could also find free software to do) and actionscript can be accomplished without having to pay through the nose for a lot of features you're not going to be using. In my opinion your best bet is to try FlashDevelop, see how you like it, and if you still feel like paying for Adobe Flash, *try it* for 30 days first, and pay only if there's something in it that you couldn't find a cheaper solution for. Most of the people here haven't shelled out the $700 it costs to get it, and if you're a student there may be a student discount available for you as well. There are plenty of free (and slightly more technically demanding) alternatives, so I'd be sure to check those out before getting the real deal.
Ephemeral dreams and perpetual ire; melodious lies from Eternity
  (4)

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